Obelisk of Manisztus

The Obelisk of Manisztus is about 4250 years old, a stone relic from ancient Mesopotamia, Its four sides are almost completely covered by an inscription in Akkadian written in cuneiform script. The Obelisk now on display in the Louvre, Paris contains the earliest known mention of the word KUTA. In reference to the ancient City of the same name.

The Obelisk of Manisztus
The Obelisk of Manisztus

Obelisk Manisztusu – a stone stela in the shape of a four-sided, obelisk narrowing towards the top, was created on the order of Manisztus (around 2270-2255 BC), the third king of the Akkadian dynasty, the son of the famous Sargon the Great. This monument was discovered at the end of the 19th century in Susa by French archaeologists; currently in the Louvre.

The Manisztus Obelisk has a height of 1.4 meters, a width of 0.6 meters and a thickness of 0.6 meters. It was made of hard, black diorite. Its four sides are almost completely covered by an inscription in Akkadian written in cuneiform script.

The content of the inscription concerns the purchase by the King of Maniszt of large areas of land near the city of Kisz . In these areas he created four large estates, which were divided into smaller plots. The king assigned these plots to his military commanders. By giving land he most probably wanted to ensure their loyalty.

Manisztus Obelisk - fragment of the inscription
Manisztus Obelisk – fragment of the inscription

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